A new tool to measure gender stereotypes in movies

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A new tool to measure gender stereotypes in movies

I love ratings tools. They are not just for parents, but for everyone to notice how many sexist movies exist. Good for Common Sense Media! Here is an excerpt of an article from the New York Times.

“Thirty-two years ago, the cartoonist Alison Bechdel proposed a test to determine whether a movie portrayed girls and women as fully formed characters: Does it have two female characters who talk to each other about something other than a man? A yes meant pass. Now the nonprofit media watchdog group Common Sense Media is applying a new test to its ratings of movies and television shows: Do they combat gender stereotypes? Founded in 2003, Common Sense Media provides parents with an online rating system that suggests age-appropriate shows for children, highlighting those that underscore admirable character traits like courage, empathy and perseverance. On Tuesday it will introduce a new metric: the portrayal of gender. At its website, a symbol with the phrase “positive gender representations” will appear with a film or TV show, meaning that reviewers judged it to prompt boys and girls to think beyond traditional gender roles.”

By |June 22nd, 2017|Categories: Advancing Women, Diversity strategies, Gender, Ideas & Inspiration|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on A new tool to measure gender stereotypes in movies

About the Author:

Maureen F. Fitzgerald, PhD is a Gender Diversity Advisor, xLawyer and Author. She consults to corporations and governments on how to advance women and specifically attract, retain and promote women. Maureen is author of twelve books, including Occupy Women, Lean Out and Invite the Bully to Tea. She has a business degree (BComm) from the University of Alberta, a law degree (JD) from the University of Western Ontario, a master’s degree in law (LLM) with distinction from the London School of Economics and a doctorate degree (PhD) from the University of British Columbia.