Silicon Valley men getting away with anything is called privilege

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Silicon Valley men getting away with anything is called privilege

This week has been a gender disaster zone in Silicon Valley. Three powerful men quit and several offered applogies for their sexist behaviour. Sadly the IT culture underbelly is not pretty. I think the most important thing to loom at is how power is maintained by a handful of men (not just why they abuse it). Venture Capitalist are the source of money and form the bastion of male power in the IT sector. So, what to do? Here is a great article with some ideas for change: “Three simple changes to Make Silicon Valley more welcoming to Women: by Minda Zetlin, Autor of the Geek Gap July 3, 2017. As she says, “Silicon Valley, you have a fundamental problem: You are in thrall to the entrepreneurs who build billion-dollar companies, and to the VCs who bet on them. That’s created a large cadre of people (and by “people” I mean white men from elite colleges) who can get away with just about anything.” Here are her three suggestions: VCs must publish the percentage of their funds they invest in women- and non-white-led start-ups; hire more female VCs; and create an organization where women can make anonymous complaints. Good start!

 

By |July 7th, 2017|Categories: Gender, Glass Ceiling, News|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Silicon Valley men getting away with anything is called privilege

About the Author:

Maureen F. Fitzgerald, PhD is a Gender Diversity Advisor, xLawyer and Author. She consults to corporations and governments on how to advance women and specifically attract, retain and promote women. Maureen is author of twelve books, including Occupy Women, Lean Out and Invite the Bully to Tea. She has a business degree (BComm) from the University of Alberta, a law degree (JD) from the University of Western Ontario, a master’s degree in law (LLM) with distinction from the London School of Economics and a doctorate degree (PhD) from the University of British Columbia.